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Caldwell named new SJC police chief

Written by InsideDP.com Staff. Posted in Schools

Caldwell BruceCALDWELLBruce Caldwell has been named Chief of Police at San Jacinto College, bringing with him more than 30 years of law enforcement and public safety experience.

Caldwell, who has served as the interim chief of police at San Jacinto College since December 2015, will oversee a San Jacinto College police force of 44 full-time officers that monitor all four San Jacinto College campuses, 10 extension centers and the College administration office. He will also oversee the College’s emergency management department and provide leadership for campus safety, crime prevention, parking and traffic control. Caldwell is the ninth police chief in the history of the department.

“I am honored to be appointed as the Chief of the San Jacinto College police department,” said Caldwell, who officially assumed the role on Jan. 1, 2017. “I am excited to continue working with the College administration and the command staff of the police department to provide quality police services to the San Jacinto College community.”

DPHS student to perform at inauguration ball

Written by InsideDP.com Staff. Posted in Schools

Fuertes AshleyIN SCHOOLS
Ashley Fuertes was supposed to participate in this year's Deer Park High School Majestic Court later this month. Instead, the senior will travel to Washington DC to perform at the presidential inauguration ball Jan. 19. She was slected from a pool of all-state dancers and is the first Deer Escort to be invited to perform at the inauguration festivities. 

SJC offers free yoga, career coaching courses

Written by InsideDP.com Staff. Posted in Schools

It’s a new year, and the Community Education Center at San Jacinto College wants to help fulfill those resolutions by offering career coaching, job training, and health and wellness workshops to community members free of charge.

The Center, located at the College’s Central Campus in room C-1.108, will host its first event on Jan. 11 with Career Pathways Coaching and Testing in partnership with Accelerate Texas from 1 to 5 p.m. This event will be followed by an information session on how to apply for free job training on Jan. 12 at 2 p.m.

TEA rating frustrates Deer Park ISD

Written by Bobby Vasquez. Posted in Schools

Deer Park ISD croppedIN SCHOOLS
A Texas Education Agency rating released Friday has school districts across the state angered and confused. Several districts, including Deer Park ISD received an F rating in a preliminary report from the TEA. DPISD Superintendent Victor White explained the rating and his frustrations with the agency, saying the ratings system is a plane flying while TEA is still building it.

SJC graduates nurses into health care industry

Written by InsideDP.com staff. Posted in Schools

SJC nursing gradsPhoto provided by San Jacinto College

Approximately 167 San Jacinto College students became nurses this fall after receiving their associate degrees in nursing (ADN).

Many of them plan to transfer to universities and pursue their Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN), while many plan to enter the workforce at surrounding hospitals and clinics. Liza Gonzalez gained valuable experience at seven clinical sites over the course of her two years in the San Jacinto College ADN program. At one of the sites, she watched the birth of a baby and is now considering working as a nurse in obstetrics and gynecology.

“At first, I was studying to become a teacher but I really found my niche in nursing,” said Gonzalez. “I plan to work as a nurse while getting my BSN online.”

Spencer Minor worked as a special education teacher and case manager for eight years after earning his bachelor’s degree from Stephen F. Austin State University. While he enjoyed the teaching profession, Minor said he found his calling in nursing and enrolled in the College’s LVN/Paramedic to ADN Transition program. LVN stands for Licensed Vocational Nursing. He is now able to work as a registered nurse for his current employer, Harris County Psychiatric Center.

“I wanted a career change because I really wanted to work in psychiatric nursing,” said Minor, who plans to pursue his BSN in the near future. “Going through the ADN program at San Jacinto College was tough; the nursing field is tough but it is all worth it.”

San Jacinto College offers ADN programs at the Central and North Campuses and an LVN/Paramedic to ADN Transition program at the South Campus. The College also offers LVN and Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) programs. For more information, visit sanjac.edu/career/nursing.

UHCL program helps 1st gen college students

Written by Bobby Vasquez. Posted in Schools

UHCL FirstGensThe Gen-One Program from UH-Clear Lake’s Office of Intercultural Student Services is designed to support the success of first-generation students at the university. Coordinator of Intercultural Student Programming, Erika Garcia (left), helps students like Jessie Kelley (right) adjust to college life and build a support network of peers, faculty and staff at UHCL. Photo by George Mattingly II/UHCL.

Being the first member of a family to go to college comes with some tough challenges, but a growing program at University of Houston-Clear Lake is ensuring that first-generation students don’t have to go it alone.

The Gen-One Program from UH-Clear Lake’s Office of Intercultural Student Services is designed to support the success of first-generation students at the university. Now in its third year, the program focuses on be responsive to the many needs of students, said Coordinator of Intercultural Student Programming Erika Garcia.

UHCL’s fall 2015 enrollment data (the most current complete data available) indicates 3,161 students, or about 35 percent of the student body, identified themselves as first-generation college students on their university application. The Pell Institute for the Study of Opportunity in Higher Education reports that targeted support and engagement on campus is especially vital for these students.

“This is such an important population at UHCL and an important population to the state of Texas,” Garcia said. “We did not want to lose sight of these students.”

Garcia knows how important programs like this can be – she’s a first-generation college graduate herself. She explained that one challenge many first-generation students face is that their families don’t always know the best ways to support them.

“I could not have these discussions with my parents because they didn’t share these experiences,” Garcia said. “To them, I was just going to school. They could not share with me how you prepare for your success in college and how it’s different than high school.”

UHCL criminology and psychology sophomore Jessie Kelley, also a first-generation student, agreed that the transition to college can be difficult.

“The closest family member I have that has attended college is my older sister, but she attended community college and did online classes, so the transition from high school to university has been pretty difficult for me,” she said. “But I’ve made connections through the Gen-One Program, and it has helped me get through my first year of college smoothly.”

Now a student ambassador at the university, she now extends that support to others.

“Most incoming students don’t have any connections in colleges, so they’re kind of thrown into the deep end with the sharks,” she said, noting that the Gen-One Program offers students friendship and advice. “The program helps anyone from a family where college is not stressed or emphasized at home.”

Support networks are vital to every student, Garcia said, and interactions with peers, faculty and staff from a similar background are an important component of that network. Students don’t just benefit from the resources and opportunities that mentors can provide. She says sometimes all students need is a sympathetic ear.

“All populations that are underrepresented at the higher education setting need validation of their experiences,” Garcia said. “This program draws on that connection with students.”

Students founded the Gen-One Program in 2014, and since Garcia joined the university last year, an important responsibility for her position has been to lead and expand the program.

First-generation is defined by the program as any student who does not have a parent or guardian with a four-year degree. While other institutions define first-generation as students whose parents have never attended college at any level, Garcia said her office wanted to offer the program’s support to a broader audience.

Last year, the program used student surveys to guide their efforts, including social gatherings, de-stressing events and information workshops about common questions, particularly regarding finances. With a year’s worth of data, research and student feedback, Garcia plans to expand the program further and increase collaboration with departments across campus. Her vision is to create a thriving community of students who support each other through college life.

“UHCL is in a demographic and geographic situation where, for the foreseeable future, it will have a large population of first-generation students,” she said. “It’s important that we continue to respond to the needs of student populations.”

To learn more about the Gen-One Program or other services offered by the Office of Intercultural Student Services, email Garcia at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or visit www.uhcl.edu/intercultural-student-services.a